OHA RELATED STRATEGIC PRIORITY

Mauli Ola, Health: To improve the quality and longevity of life, Native Hawaiians will enjoy healthy lifestyles and experience reduced onset of chronic diseases. Learn more about the work we do at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to create systemic change in Mauli Ola, Health.

Live Births of Resident Native Hawaiian Mothers and Trimester of First Prenatal Care Visit in Hawaiʻi (2000-2009)

BACKGROUND

Early identification of maternal disease and risks for complications of pregnancy or birth are the primary reasons for first trimester entry into prenatal care. This can help ensure that women with complex problems and women with chronic illness or other risks are seen by specialists if required. Early high quality prenatal care is critical to improving pregnancy outcomes (Hawaiʻi PRAMS).

Based on Births Where Mother Received Late or No Prenatal Care Based on Percent of Births Where Mother Received Late or No Prenatal Care

Live Births for the State of Hawaii (Residents Only) In Which the Mother Received Late or No Prenatal Care, for the Years 2000-2011

OHA INVESTS IN THE COMMUNITY

To support Native Hawaiians building greater prenatal care, OHA solicits proposals every biennium to provide services that increase the percent of Native Hawaiian who improve their capacity to own or rent a home. In the years 2014-2015, OHA is working with three community organizations to specifically provide services to increase prenatal care services for women and their families. Molokai General Hospital, North Hawaii Community Hospital, and Waimanalo Health Center currently provides 500 Native Hawaiians with prenatal services.

Characteristics of Mothers with Preconception Overweight and Obesity, Hawai‘i PRAMS 2004-2008

Early Breastfeeding Patterns by Maternal Characteristics, Hawai‘i PRAMS 2004-2006

Characteristics of Mothers with Maternal Diabetes and Pregnancy, Hawai‘i PRAMS 2004-2008

Characteristics of Mothers with High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy, Hawaii PRAMS 2004-2008

Based on Based on Births Where Mother Received Late or No Prenatal Care, this table tracks live Births for the State of Hawaii (Residents Only) In Which the Mother Received Late or No Prenatal Care, for the Years 2000-2011

This chart compares "Live births to mother receiving late or no prenatal care" in 2002 to "Live births to mothers receiving no first-trimester care" in 2005-2008.

TERMS

Hawaiʻi Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS): A survey project funded by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with the Hawaiʻi Department of
Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring (OHSM) to identify and monitor maternal behaviors and experiences before, during, and in the first few months after a live birth in Hawaiʻi. The first full
year of data was collected in 2000.

Healthy People 2020 (HP2020): A comprehensive report published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that provides national health goals and objectives on 42 topic
areas for a 10-year period.

Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB): The governmental program in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) responsible for ensuring the health and well-being of women,
infants, and children.

Prenatal Care: Prenatal care is medical attention given to the expectant mother and her developing baby. It also involves the mother’s caring for herself by following her health care provider’s advice, practicing good nutrition, getting plenty of rest, exercising sensibly, and avoiding things that could harm her or her baby (MCHB).

SOURCE

Hawai'i State Department of Health, Family Health Services Division. (2010a). Hawai‘i Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) Trend Report 2000–2008. Honolulu: HI.

Hawaiʻi Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) Trend Report 2000-2008. Retrieved on June 07, 2013 from http://hawaii.gov/health/doc/pramstrendreport2010.pdf

Healthy People 2020. Retrieved on June 07, 2013 from http://healthypeople.gov/2020/ topicsobjectives2020/TechSpecs.aspx?hp2020id=MICH-10.1

Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Retrieved on June 17, 2013 from http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/ programs/womeninfants/prenatal.html

Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA). Native Hawaiian Data Book 2011. Retrieved on June 06, 2013 from http://www.ohadatabook.com/T07-06a-11.pdf

Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA). Ka Wai Ola, May 2013, Vol. 30, No. 5. Retrieved on June 07, 2013 from http://www.oha.org/ka-wai-ola/mei-2013 State Department of Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring (OHSM). Retrieved on June 06, 2013 from http://hawaii.gov/health/statistics/vital-statistics/index.html

OHA Research Disclaimer. The data presented have been vetted for accuracy; however, there is no warranty that it is error-free. The data itself does not represent or confer any legal rights of any kind. Please use suggested citation and report discrepancies to the OHA Research Division.

REFERENCES

OHA Health Indicator Sheet, Prenatal 2012

OHA Native Hawaiian Health Fact Sheet 2011

For more interesting data relating to Mauli Ola, Health, please see the OHA Native Hawaiian Data Book.