OHA RELATED STRATEGIC PRIORITY

Moʻomeheu, Culture: To strengthen identity, Native Hawaiians will preserve, practice and perpetuate their culture Learn more about the work we do at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to create systemic change in Moʻomeheu, Culture.

BACKGROUND

Today, traditional history and culture remain essential components of identity for Native Hawaiians, but are also important as a basis for residence in Hawaiʻi among non-Hawaiian populations living in the Islands. In order to strengthen Native Hawaiian identity and the lāhui, or nation, it is vital that OHA nurture initiatives that increase the perceived value of Native Hawaiian culture and history among all Hawaiʻi residents. These efforts will in turn foster greater support for initiatives that impact Native Hawaiians within the state and federal governments.

The "Value History and Culture Strategic Result" is one of only two results that targets Hawaiʻi residents, a category which is inclusive of Native Hawaiians and non-Hawaiians; see terms.

OHA BASELINE TARGET - Tracking Value History & Culture

OHA INVESTS IN THE COMMUNITY

OHA ADVOCATES FOR THE COMMUNITY

TERMS

Appreciate: to grasp the nature, worth, quality, or significance of, to value or ad-mire highly; often connotes sufficient understanding to enjoy or admire excellence (Merriam Webster, 2011)

Hawai‘i resident: An individual who maintains a permanent domicile in the State of Hawaiʻi, inclusive of sheltered and unsheltered homeless, institutionalized individuals in prisons or asylums, military personnel stationed in Hawai„i, as well as students attending institutions of higher learning (HRS §78-1, HRS§11-13; U.S. Census Bureau, 2010; University of Hawaiʻi, 2010)

Kanaka: Hawaiian language term for a person of Native Hawaiian descent or ancestry. Kānaka refers to the different populations of Native Hawaiians living in Hawaiʻi (Pukui, 1986)

Loina: cultural practices, rules and customs (Pukui, 1986; Basham, 2010, p. 38)

Mo‘olelo: Lit., "succession of oral traditions." Historical narratives; traditionally these were recorded and transmitted orally, an important medium of history (Pukui, 1972, 1986; Young, 1995)

Mo‘omeheu: Lit., "a series of tracks or footprints"; a word that is used to describe an approximation of Native Hawaiian culture; collective and individual ancestral beliefs and practices that are passed from generation to generation (Pukui, 1986)

Mo‘okū‘auhau: Lit., "succession of genealogies." Genealogies: traditionally these were recorded and transmitted orally, an important medium of history (Pukui, 1972, 1986; Dibble, 1843, p. 10; Malo, 1956, p. 4)

Native Hawaiian: any individual who is a descendant of the aboriginal people who, prior to 1778, occupied and exercised sovereignty in the area that now constitutes the State of Hawaiʻi (U.S. Public Law 103-150)

Non-Hawaiian: any individual who is not a descendant of the aboriginal people who, prior to 1778, occupied and exercised sovereignty in the area that now constitutes the State of Hawaiʻi and encompasses individuals of wide range of ethnic or ancestral backgrounds (Working definition based on U.S. Public Law 103-150)

‘Ōiwi: Hawaiian language term for a person of Native Hawaiian descent or ancestry (Pukui, 1986)

Value: relative worth or importance, to consider with high regard or to attribute esteem, to cherish (Merriam Webster, 2011)

SOURCES

Andrews, L. (1865). A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language, to Which is Ap-pended an English-Hawaiian Vocabulary and A Chronological Table of Remarkable Events. Honolulu, HI: Henry M. Whitney.

Basham, L. (2010). Ka Lähui Hawai„i: He Mo„olelo, He „Äina, He Loina, a He Ea Käkou.

Hülili, 6, pp. 37-72.

Dibble, S. (1843). A History of the Sandwich Islands. Lahainaluna, HI: Press of the Mission Seminary.

Kana'iaupuni, S. M., N. Malone, & Ishibashi, K. (2005). Ka Huaka‘i: 2005 Native Hawaiian Educational Assessment. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools, Pauahi Publications.

Malo, D. (1951). Hawaiian Antiquities. Honolulu, HI: Bishop Museum Press.

Office of Hawaiian Affairs. (1984). Population Needs Assessment Survey. Hono-lulu, HI: Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

Office of Hawaiian Affairs. (2010). 2010-2018 Strategic Plan of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Honolulu, HI: Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

Pukui, M. K., Haertig, E.W., & Lee, C.A. (1972). Nana i ke Kumu: Look to the Source, Vol. 1. Honolulu, HI: Queen Lili„uokalani Children‟s Center.

Pukui, M. K., Haertig, E.W., Lee, C.A., & McDermott, J.F. (1972). Nana i ke Kumu: Look to the Source, Vol. 2. Honolulu, HI: Queen Lili„uokalani Chil-dren‟s Center.

Pukui, M.K & S. H. Elbert. (1986). Hawaiian Dictionary. Honolulu, HI. Univer-sity of Hawai„i Press.

SMS Research. (2007). Survey on Hawaiian Beliefs/Behaviors and Maintaining Hawaiian Traditions. Honolulu, HI: SMS Research.

State of Hawai'i. (2008). Hawai'i 2050 Sustainability Plan. Honolulu, HI: Hawai„i 2050 Sustainability Task Force, Hawai„i Institute of Public Affairs. Retrieved from: http://www.hawaii2050.org/images/uploads/Hawaii2050_Plan_FINAL.pdf

REFERENCES

For more interesting data relating to Moʻomeheu, Culture, please see the OHA Native Hawaiian Data Book.